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Rethinking Educational Technology: Some Early Steps



Datum: 24.05.2011
Uhrzeit: 17 Uhr c.t.

Ort: Cartesium Rotunde


Vortragende(r): Prof. Michael Eisenberg Homepage - Vortragende(r) ( Dept. of Computer Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, U.S.A. )

Abstract:

The field of educational technology has long been influenced by what might be called a "cognitive" focus within education. The cognitive scientist tends to view education as a matter of building knowledge structures, countering misconceptions, and building effective study habits.

This is all perfectly reasonable, but it leads to an arguably narrow view of educational technology. An alternative -- and less restrictive -- way of thinking about educational technology is to focus on education, development, and children's lives through a more anthropological lens: How do children develop lifelong interests? How do they spend their time? What opportunities for technological innovation do we see in the major elements of children's culture? These are questions that lead to relatively unexplored themes for the design of educational technology.

In this talk I will outline a number of anthropological themes that suggest novel possibilities and projects in educational technology. Some of the examples will build on projects currently underway in our Craft Technology Lab at CU; others will look toward future projects, not yet begun.



Brief bio:

Michael Eisenberg is a professor in the Department of Computer Science and Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Colorado, Boulder.
His research interests focus on mathematics and science education, and
in blending novel technologies with the best traditions of hands-on crafts for children. He is the author of a programming textbook, a published play, and a (still frustratingly unpublished) murder mystery, along with
lots of academic papers. He received his doctorate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1991.









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