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4.31 Elementarmethode "Proze▀diagramme" (PRODIAG)  

  4.31 Elementary Method "Process Diagrams" (PRODIAG)

Contents  
  • 1 Identification/Definition of the Method
  • 2 Brief Characteristic of the Method
  • 3 Limits of the Methods Application
  • 4 Specification of the Methods Allocation
  • 5 Interfaces
  • 6 Further Literature
  • 7 Functional Tool Requirements
  • Links to the V-Model Mailinglist
  • 1 Identification/Definition of the Method

    /Booch, 1994/ Object-Oriented Analysis and Design with Applications

    2 Brief Characteristic of the Method

    Objective and Purpose

    The method is applied for the object-oriented system development. The objective is to show the physical configuration of processors and of external devices used as a platform for the execution of the system. In addition, the processes running on the processors have to be specified. Processes can be defined for active objects that were identified during COM - Class/Object Modeling having their own control flow, and for required main programs.

    Means of Representation

    The method was defined by Grady Booch and is part of the complex method "Object-Oriented Analysis and Design (OOAD)" /Booch, 1997/.

    The process architecture of a system can be graphically represented in form of process diagrams. The processor symbol can be used to represent hardware units that execute programs. Each processor has to be identified with a name. Processor symbols may be supplemented with a list of process names. Hardware units that cannot themselves execute programs have to be represented as devices. As for processors, names have to be allocated to devices. Physical communications like e.g Ethernet connections or paths to a shared memory have to be represented via connections. Optionally, each connection can be identified with a name referring to the type of connection. Detailed information about processors, devices, connections or processes can be stored as text in supplementing descriptions.

    The process diagram concepts defined by Booch have been integrated into the Unified Modeling Language (UML) /Booch, 1994/. The "Deployment Diagrams" there defined have to be considered as comparable means of representation.

    Operational Sequence

    The generation of the process architecture must be realized during the design phase when, based on implementational reasons, the relationships between classes and objects are specified, both from logical and from a physical aspects. It must be generated in connection with the method used for complex software and in direct agreement with the COM - Class/Object Modeling and the module definition (method MODIAG - Module Diagrams).

    With regard to the Booch method, the process architecture is generated in iterative steps during the design phase. During each run, updates, modifications or specifications can be realized.

    3 Limits of the Methods Application

    - not applicable -

    4 Specification of the Methods Allocation

    No. Activity Description
    4.1 SD1.1 - Recording of Actual Status and Analysis With the help of this method the execution platform of the old system, i. e. the applied processors and external devices as well as the existing process structure can be captured.

    The method covers subproduct User Requirements.Actual Status and Current Analysis from the point of view of processors, external devices and the process structure.

    4.2 SD1.2 - Description of Application System With the help of this method, specifications or first approaches can be defined for the execution platform of the overall horizon.

    This method covers subproduct User Requirements.Preliminary System Description from the point of view of processors and external devices.

    4.3 SD1.4 - Definition of Marginal Conditions With the help of this method technical or organizational marginal conditions can be specified for the execution platform of the system.

    The method covers subproduct User Requirements.Marginal Conditions from the point of view of processors and external devices.

    4.4 SD2.1 - Technical System Design With the help of this method technical or organizational marginal conditions can be specified for the execution platform of the system.

    The method covers subproduct Technical Requirements.Overall Function of Element for the system from the point of view of processors and external devices. In subproduct System Architecture.Technical System Structure the information about the execution platform can be updated.

    4.5 SD3.5 - Definition of Requirements for the Development and SWMM Environment With the help of the methods, requirements to the execution platform of the development and SWMM environment can be defined.

    The method covers subproduct Technical Requirements.Technical Requirements for the Development and SWMM Environment from the point of view of the execution platform.

    4.6 SD4.1 - SW Architecture Design Method PRODIAG can be applied for the process design. The execution platform can be specified in the process diagrams and an overview of the processes can be listed. Detailed information about interruptions, communication mechanisms, synchronization mechanisms, processors or scheduling can be stored in supplementing descriptions.

    The method covers subproducts SW Architecture.Solution Proposals and SW Architecture.Modularization/Database Design from the point of view of processors, external devices and processes.

    5 Interfaces

    No. Interface Observation Information in Annex 1
    5.1 PRODIAG-COM The active objects defined in method COM having their own control flow can be modeled as separate processes in method PRODIAG.  
    5.2 PRODIAG-MODIAG For ever process defined in method PRODIAG a separate main program must be specified in method MODIAG.  

    6 Further Literature

    /Booch, 1997/ Unified Modeling Language, Version 1.0

    7 Functional Tool Requirements

    SSD25 - Supporting Process Diagrams

    Links to the V-Model Mailinglist

    Mail 0200 - Re: Methodenzuordnung fuer UML (200)

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