Previous Next V-Model Official Homepage by IABG  
Part 3: Collection of Manuals Homepage  
Scenarios  Homepage  
SC.3 Grand Design (Traditional Procedure)  

  SZ.3 Grand Design (Traditionelles Vorgehen)

Contents  
  • SC.3.1 Sequence Description for the Activities in Submodel SD
  • SC.3.2 Cooperation with the other Submodels
  •       SC.3.2.1 Cooperation with Submodels SD and PM
  •       SC.3.2.2 Cooperation of Submodels SD and QA
  •       SC.3.2.3 Cooperation of Submodels SD and CM
  • SC.3.3 Criteria for the Selection of the Scenario
  • SC.3.1 Sequence Description for the Activities in Submodel SD

    The traditional procedure for a system development is frequently referred to as "Big Bang", "One Shot" or "Grand Design".

    Typical in this procedure is the linear chronological course of the system development (phase model). During each phase, the entire System is handled in its complete functionality. The complete conclusion of a phase is the requirement for the beginning of the next phase.

    Therefore, the traditional procedure is a special case in the incremental development (realization in increments). The sequence of SD activities during the Grand Design are illustrated in Figure SC.3.

    Figure SC.3
    Figure SC.3: Sequence of SD Activities in Grand Design

    Time T 0-Start

    Initialization of project and beginning of activities with regard to the contents of submodel SD.

    Time T 1-Complete User Requirements

    From the point of view of activity SD1 - System Requirements Analysis, the System has been completely processed at T1. This means:

    Time T 2-Completion of the System Development and System Transition

    At time 2, the system development is completed and the System transferred for use.

    The following steps are required for the realization:

    After the System has been transferred, the development project is completed.

    SC.3.2 Cooperation with the other Submodels

    SC.3.2.1 Cooperation with Submodels SD and PM

    The schematically regulated and relatively rigid development procedure of a project as the one just described can-with sufficient experience in the application field-be planned and realized with foresight and limited risks by the specification of requirements.

    The special problematics of the phase-oriented procedure are based on the limited and costly mechanisms for the consideration of unexpected changes and the inexperienced handling of requirements insufficiently or badly explained.

    Based on experience, such a procedure can be dependably and successfully applied only when requirements are very clearly defined and when technical and user-level risks for the project are low.

    Therefore, one of the special tasks of the PM is a sensible risk management that detects risks at a very early stage and is thus able to change the development strategy.

    SC.3.2.2 Cooperation of Submodels SD and QA

    Based on changes detected and specified early, the quality assurance tasks must be planned and realized regularly. If the above mentioned risks can be eliminated, no special procedures with regard to quality assurance have to be observed.

    SC.3.2.3 Cooperation of Submodels SD and CM

    The structured generation of the System according to the product structure is covered in the regulations of the configuration management. Since the System transfer into the system application is realized with one step, the delivery is simple.

    SC.3.3 Criteria for the Selection of Scenarios

    The following list of advantages and disadvantages and the listing of the most important requirements support decision-making for the selection of the illustrated Grand Design procedure.

    Advantages:

    Disadvantages: Requirements: The mentioned individual advantages and disadvantages must be investigated and evaluated. They cannot be applied to all projects but have to be assessed on the basis of the user-level and Technical Requirements and the marginal conditions to be observed.

    Previous Next This page online  •  GDPA Online  •  Last Updated 03.Mar.2004 by C. Freericks