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RE.3.3.2. System Architecture (SysArc)  

  Systemarchitektur

Contents  
  • Introduction
  • Document Index
  • Document Structure
  • Introduction

    The System Architecture describes the static system structure as a network structure with the elements of the generic product structure. The description includes the elements of the product structure up to the SW Units/HW Units. The architectures of the SW Units and the HW Units can be found in the corresponding architecture documents.

    The product System Architecture includes possible solution proposals, results from feasibility studies, the IT security concept, the IT security model, and the allocation between User Requirements and the elements of the System Architecture.


    Document Index

    1. General Information
    2. System Structure
         2.1. Representation of the Technical System Architecture
               2.1.1. Technical System Structure
               2.1.2. Identification of Interfaces
               2.1.3. Requirements Allocation
         2.2. Explanation of the Cooperation of Technical Elements

    Document Structure

    1. General Information

    See schema 1. General Information.

    2. System Structure

    2.1.Representation of the Technical System Architecture

    2.1.1. Technical System Structure

    The System is represented as a network of elements of the technical architecture. In this connection, the possibilities of the generic product structure are applied, if possible, to combine SW Units/HW Units into suitable Segments, and the Segments into Systems. The architectural parts are uniquely identified and marked by means of the information from the CM Plan. The element list of the architecture must be complete and consistent.

    Those parts of the System that are to be realized with off-the-shelf products or in which off-the-shelf products are to be used have to be specified.

    During the System Architecture design it is necessary to observe that, normally, the technical structure of an IT system and the organization at the user have an impact on each other. The user organization has an important impact on solution approaches, and has to be consulted, on the one hand, with regard to considerations about the System Architecture. In IT systems with a client-server architecture, on the other hand, capacities for technical system and user support may have to be planned at the actual site, in the user organization. These considerations should also include the distribution of new system versions and variants during system utilization, and should be regulated in an organizational manner. In this connection, both technical and economical aspects have to be taken into consideration.

    2.1.2. Identification of Interfaces

    The identification of the interfaces results from the architecture; the interfaces are uniquely identified in a table, together with the name of the corresponding partner. The interfaces are defined within the scope of the technical design. This is where the system-internal and system-external interfaces are identified. Technical interfaces are identified that, in general, do not uniquely match with user-level interfaces.

    2.1.3. Requirements Allocation

    The relationships between the elements of the System Architecture (Segments and SW Units/HW Units) and the requirements (interface requirements, functional requirements, quality requirements, etc.) as well as the marginal conditions contained in the product User Requirements are set up in the form of a table. This is to prove that all requirements and marginal conditions are addressed by the elements of the System Architecture.

    The table includes

    The following items have to be observed: When allocating User Requirements to elements, it is possible to make references to the specifications with regard to technical operation. While doing so, it is possible to refer to technical architecture.

    In object-oriented development, the following must be observed: The functional User Requirements are described by means of "use cases". These User Requirements are finally realized in class hierarchies and the corresponding cooperation. In object-oriented development, the allocation of the User Requirements can therefore be realized by an allocation of "use cases" to class (hierarchy) groups, whereby these requirements will be met by the cooperation of these "use cases" and class groups.

    2.2. Explanation of the Cooperation of Technical Elements

    This contains an illustration of the technical sequences of operation, as they result from the technical architectural decisions. This is only realized on the basis of the technical architecture. (In no case does this concern a change or overlap with regard to the contents with the user-level business processes.)

    In addition, the inter-computer process communication that is to be refined within the scope of the Software Architecture at some later time must also be described here, if necessary.

    Examples: Technical operation of the users' communication via a client-server network on the basis of a Novell network; technical solution for the access of selected users to the Internet; technical support of the signature tracing via e-mail.

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